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How to Make Compost

Compost not only gets rid of kitchen and garden waste, it also gets better with age. There are lots of ways to create your own and it can be as advanced as a high tech compost tumbler and as basic as a hidden away pile covered in carpet, it’s all part of life’s cycle, the only difference is the efficiency in which it’s carried out.

To enable your compost to break down it’s important to let it sit for at least one and a half to two years in most cases, and in order to do this a three year cycle is often used. The organic matter from the house and garden three years ago will be this years to use, the year afters in the next and so on.

To hold it all together it is advised to pile all of the material into used wooden boxes or crates and cover them with carpet. This will keep the light out and the heat in to allow the organic matter to break down. As the bacteria(mesophiles) multiply the temperature can rise to over 90 fahrenheit and more on a hot day.

To speed things up a little there are plenty of products like Garotta that will help the process that much more but overall i can’t recommend a worm farm highly enough! Although these are often smaller(but can be as big as you like) there is no beating the quality of worm compost. Even better is the insanely nutrient rich worm juice that is perfect to use as a liquid fertiliser.

There are lots of imaginative ways that you can create your own compost to save on costs and recreate lifes natural cycle in your particular space.

Below is an interesting video on how to build a worm farm in the pathways of your garden! If you’re interested in having someone to build your very own compost area we will be able to advise you with your best option. Get in touch on our contact page to find out more.

To have a look at the cross section of a compost bin

Worm Farming in Your Pathways by Subtleleaf




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